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Year : 2017  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 7-

Next-generation sequencing of non-small cell lung cancer using a customized, targeted sequencing panel: Emphasis on small biopsy and cytology

David M DiBardino1, David W Rawson2, Anjali Saqi3, Jonas J Heymann3, Carlos A Pagan3, William A Bulman4 
1 Division of Pulmonology, Allergy, Immunology and Critical Care, Section of Interventional Pulmonology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
2 Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA
3 Department of Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA
4 Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA

Correspondence Address:
David M DiBardino
Division of Pulmonology, Allergy, Immunology and Critical Care, Section of Interventional Pulmonology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
USA

Background: Next-generation sequencing (NGS) with a multi-gene panel is now available for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, but the performance characteristics and clinical utility of this testing are not well-described. We present the results of an extended 467 gene panel in a series of advanced, highly selected nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients using a range of specimens, including predominantly small biopsy and cytology specimens. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 22 NSCLC biopsies sent for NGS using an extended gene panel from January 2014 to July 2015. The customized NGS panel sequences 467 cancer-associated genes with exonic and intronic sequences obtained from purified tumor DNA. Genomic alterations, patient characteristics, and success of testing were determined. Results: The majority of samples tested were metastatic lung adenocarcinoma on final pathology. Of the 22 specimens tested, 5 (22.7%) were surgical resections and 17 (77.3%) were small biopsy and cytology specimens. Twenty-one (95%) of the specimens were adequate for full sequencing and yielded a total of 204 genomic alterations (average 8.9 per tumor), of which 17 (average 0.81 per tumor) were actionable and/or clinically relevant. Genomic alterations were found most commonly in the TP53, EGFR, EPHB1, MLL3, APC, SETD2, KRAS, DNMT3A, RB1, CDKN2A, ARID1A, EP300, KDM6B, RAD50, STK11, and BRCA2 genes. Conclusions: NGS using a comprehensive gene panel was performed successfully in 95% of all NSCLC cases in this series, including 94% small biopsy and cytology specimens and 100% surgical resections. This custom assay was performed on a range of tumor specimens and demonstrates that small specimens are able to provide a similar depth of information as larger ones. As many patients present at an advanced stage and only small specimens are obtained, the information these provide has the potential for guiding treatment in highly selected patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma.


How to cite this article:
DiBardino DM, Rawson DW, Saqi A, Heymann JJ, Pagan CA, Bulman WA. Next-generation sequencing of non-small cell lung cancer using a customized, targeted sequencing panel: Emphasis on small biopsy and cytology.CytoJournal 2017;14:7-7


How to cite this URL:
DiBardino DM, Rawson DW, Saqi A, Heymann JJ, Pagan CA, Bulman WA. Next-generation sequencing of non-small cell lung cancer using a customized, targeted sequencing panel: Emphasis on small biopsy and cytology. CytoJournal [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Mar 23 ];14:7-7
Available from: http://www.cytojournal.com/article.asp?issn=1742-6413;year=2017;volume=14;issue=1;spage=7;epage=7;aulast=DiBardino;type=0